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School Fundraising Tips & Success Stories from Schoola

Tag: Overcoming Obstacles

How to Deal when Homework Nights are Hell!

Mother helping her daughter for her homework

 

 

 

Homework Nights are Hell, by Tre Harrington

This year I have one kiddo in high school and one in elementary school. The child in high school is easy. He comes home, has a snack and does his work. There are no fights, no hostage negotiations, and no tears. The kid in elementary school, she is another story.

We have three children: oldest who is fifteen, middle who is ten, and then there is youngest, our two year old. Middle is in fourth grade this year. I have no idea what they are prepping these kiddos for, but I assume upon completion of fourth grade, she should be a brain surgeon. Each night middle child has had at least an hour and a half of homework. With her constant yelling, fits, defiant rages, and screaming, it typically takes about four hours. By the end of it, the husband and I are ready to call it a night and break out the wine.

I feel bad for her, but I can’t let her know that. I realize these kiddos put in hard days at school. It is stressful for them. I truly believe that they work hard all day and all of the homework is daunting for them. Middle child is also autistic. We do not let her use that as an excuse though. She gets no special considerations, and she is expected to do the same amount of work as her peers. I imagine it would be much easier on her, and us, to use her disability to her advantage. We could easily say that this amount of homework is not within her capabilities, but we know she is. It would not be beneficial to her long term. We do not let middle child be set apart in any way, instead we fight to keep her as mainstream as possible. Even if it means fighting for hours and hours over homework.

We did find a few helpful hints for homework time. These are not full proof and I cannot guarantee they will even work. The best you can do is try. In our home, they work sometimes, depending on middle’s mood. Like parenting, homework time is all about making mistakes and learning from them.

  1. Let the child be in control. If they have four different subjects, let them choose what order they do things in. It allows them to feel like they are making the rules. This is pretty important to them, especially after being told what to do all day.
  2. Be sure the child gets a ten minute break when they walk in the door. No talk about school, no unpacking the backpack, just allow them to unwind. When you get off work, you need some time to decompress. Give them that as well.
  3. If you see the child getting frustrated, have them take a time out. No toys or television, just have them sit in a quiet place for a few minutes. Let them chill and be calm. They are getting frustrated, so work to stop the blow up before it occurs.
  4. We have found that getting through the hardest subjects first works best. If your child struggles in math, and they save it until last, it will be weighing on them all homework time. So, try to get it out of the way. If it is taking too long, break it into sections and work on something else in-between sections.
  5. Use positive reinforcement. You cannot ever tell your child how awesome, smart, or wonderful they are enough! Do it! Many, many times a day.

Every time you and your child are having an awful homework night, know there are many other parents going through the exact same thing as well. In the end, it is worth it. We are raising the future doctors, scientists, and teachers. So, take a deep breath and tell your kiddo they are awesome and keep going. You only have to do this until they graduate.

trelynn@nonperfectparenting
www.nonperfectparenting.com
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www.twitter.com/notperfecttre
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www.pinterest.com/treharrington

 

 

 

Introducing Schoola2U: Bringing More Funds to Bay Area Schools

Another school year is in full swing, and we’re as committed as ever to find ways to support important programs that impact students’ academic success – including art, music and physical education.

Despite the fact that California is home to more million-dollar tax filers than any other state in the U.S., there is still a significant wealth gap between Bay Area residents and the money allotted to education. Schools in the San Francisco Bay Area are taking matters into their own hands – one out of every 10 schools in the Bay Area is using Schoola to raise much needed funds. 

We’ve come a long way from the five Bay Area schools we launched with in June 2013. Today, we have more than 500 Bay Area schools raising money through our program.

One of our schools, Yick Wo Elementary in San Francisco, raised more than $1,000 to put school supplies in the classroom during the 2013-2014 school year, and is partnering with us to help fund its art program this year.

We’re proud to be an ally to Bay Area parents looking to supplement school resources, and we want to do more to help.  So this week we are debuting our fundraising fleet – 6 three-wheeled pop-up shops will be hitting the road to raise awareness and drive donations to local schools.  Our bikes will be visiting Bay Area visiting schools, museums and family festivals spreading the word about how parents can raise money for schools by doing something they already do – buying clothes for their kids!

Schoola has pledged to donate an additional $5 to the shoppers’ school of choice for every purchase made from the pop-up shops – with a goal of raising $100,000 for local schools.

We look forward to continuing support the local schools in our own backyard with this initiative. You can follow @Schoola on Twitter, Facebook & @Schoola2U on Instagram for updates on our Bay Area Tour – it’s going to be #WheelieGood!

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Abyssinian Benefit Schools

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Physical activity has a vital role in education. Play breaks help young learners release stress, get their blood moving, and re-energize their minds so they can return to the classroom focused and ready for success.

Schoola is partnering with Abyssinian Development Corporation to provide the equipment and opportunities students in Harlem need to build healthy bodies and healthy minds.

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For the kids at many Harlem schools, the benefits of physical activity don’t come easily. With no gym, the playground is the only place students can get the exercise they need. As they file outside for their 20-minute recess period after lunch, though, all they find is a patch of astroturf, a cracked blacktop, a couple of aging basketball hoops, and some stray furniture. They’re making do with what they have—but imagine how much they could discover about themselves and the possibilities available to them through a play structure with swings and a slide, as well as a level surface to run and play safely.

Schoola is helping these schools build their students’ academic success and well-being by launching an effort and building a community to raise $25,000 for a playground upgrade. Here’s how you can help:

• Donate used clothing to be sold on the Schoola e-commerce site—designate your donation to Abyssinian Benefit Schools or start a fundraiser for your own school

• Do your own shopping on Schoola.com—$2 of every $5 you spend goes to schools to save physical education, music, art and other essential programs

• Help us spread the word and build an even bigger community to support fulfilling the potential of all kids

JOIN US – So we can show the kids at at these Harlem schools and thousands of others like them that we care—and make a positive change in their school experience every day of the week.

See their story at http://www.schoola.com/savepe

@schoola #clothesforschools

KIPP Academy

 

Not long ago, Sir Ron was struggling at school. He was falling behind academically and losing faith that he had the ability to succeed.

Now he’s gained a new sense of his own potential, and he has a plan for his future. His transformation started behind a drum kit—but now it extends through every part of his day. Sir Ron’s peers respect him. And he believes in himself. You’ll find stories like Sir Ron’s throughout KIPP Academy Middle School thanks to the school’s commitment to music education. Schoola is joining KIPP Academy to help make that difference in students’ lives every day.

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A small school in the Bronx, KIPP Academy works hard to support kids who need all the help they can get. Ninety-five percent of its students qualify for free or reduced cost lunch. More than one in seven receive special education services. Music helps KIPP Academy reach and engage every child who enters its doors. The slogan on the Music Room wall sets the stage—All of Us Will Learn Music. No matter what backgrounds they come from or what challenges they face, they learn lessons together that will serve them the rest of their lives—like how to lead a section, follow direction, and work as a team, and why it’s important to hit the right notes at the right time. Researchers have written volumes about the benefits of music education in developing young minds, but for the kids at KIPP, it’s all about making beautiful music together.

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Schoola is launching an effort and building a community to help KIPP Academy fulfill its mission by raising $25,000 to support its music program. Here’s how you can help:
• Donate used clothing to be sold on the Schoola e-commerce site—designate your donation to KIPP or start a fundraiser for your own school
• Do your own shopping on Schoola.com—$2 of every $5 you spend goes to schools to save music, art, physical education, and other essential programs
• Help us spread the word and build an even bigger community to support fulfilling the potential of all kids at schools like KIPP Academy

Join us! So we can help Sir Ron and thousands of other kids like him see themselves and the world in new ways. It’s a big job, but there’s no job more important.

See their story at http://www.schoola.com/kipp

@schoola #clothesforschools

Yick Wo Elementary School

 

 

YickWo_1Art can be one of the most important parts of a young student’s life. It teaches kids that it’s okay to be creative and take risks at school—not just in the art room, but in math, languages, and every other subject they study. The educational benefits of an art program are well known, but it’s still not covered by most public school budgets. The parents at Yick Wo Elementary make sure that their school’s students have art class anyway, and Schoola is forming a community to help them do it.

Serving San Francisco’s North Beach, Russian Hill, and Chinatown neighborhoods, Yick Wo relies on fundraising to provide enrichment programs for its 260+ students of diverse cultural and economic backgrounds. The experiences of the children show that it’s well worth the effort. “School has a lot of rules to follow but in art you can be free. You can see what you have in front of you and then turn that into something different,” says Orly. “I feel like I can make anything happen. It’s awesome!” says Lars. Art class builds confidence and provides enduring lessons for the students at Yick Wo—as long as the school can continue to provide the raw materials for their inspiration.YickWo_2

Schoola is launching an effort and building a community to help raise $25,000 to support arts programs at Yick Wo. Here’s how you can get involved:

  • Donate used clothing to be sold on the Schoola e-commerce site—designate your donation to Yick Wo or start a fundraiser for your own school
  • Do your own shopping on Schoola.com—$2 of every $5 you spend goes to schools to save art, music, physical education, and other essential programs
  • Help us spread the word and build an even bigger community to support fulfilling the potential of all kids at schools like Yick Wo

Join us to make sure art keeps broadening young minds, opening new channels for self-expression, and fostering the creativity that fuels achievement for the students at Yick Wo.

See their story at http://www.schoola.com/yickwo

@schoola #clothesforschools

 

7/11 – 31 Days of Smart Summer Fun, Day 11: Summer Is for Tackling Physical Challenges

One of our very favorite books about summertime is Judy Blume’s funny and touching Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great. It seems amazing that a book published in 1972 could remain so relevant and appealing, but our kids can attest that it does.

Sheila the Great zeroes in on what makes summer vacation so important for kids: the opportunity to take on challenges besides schoolwork—chief among them physical challenges. After nine months’ worth of book learning and time inside a classroom, kids need not only exercise and fresh air, but also a chance to test their physical limits and courage.

In the book, Sheila’s parents are determined that this is the summer she will learn how to swim. With the help of her very patient swim teacher, Sheila gradually overcomes her fear, and by the end of the book, she is able to swim across the pool and pass the beginner swim test. Even though there are four-year-olds at the pool who swim far better than she can, Sheila feels so proud of herself: “I can swim. I proved it to everyone, including myself!”

This, in a nutshell, is what summer’s physical challenges can do for kids: give them a sense of empowerment and self-confidence unlike anything a classroom provides. Here are a few that our kids are tackling this summer:
– riding a bike
– hiking a mountain
– trying a zip line
– jumping off a high dive
– trying out a new sport
– riding a horse
– being brave enough to pick up a frog or toad or harmless garden snake.

The choice of activity itself doesn’t matter; what matters is that our kids have a chance to put themselves to the test, make some progress, and become more resilient and self-assured in the process.

#schoolasummer

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